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Scariest movie of the year: Hell Fest

A slasher horror with a psychological twist Many horror movies are released each year, but one of the most unique and haunting choices of 2018 is Hell Fest. The film takes on the fairly standard formula of a serial killer dressing up and pretending to

Review: Halloween is gory, fun, and well done

Myers is back and better than ever by Isaiah Mancha and Alexander Elmore After narrowly escaping an Oct. 31 killing spree in 1978, Jamie Lee Curtis returns 40 years later as Laurie Strode to face off yet again against Michael Myers in 2018’s Halloween. Set

Review: The House with a Clock in its Walls

Black, Blanchett, and Vaccaro deliver Eli Roth’s The House with a Clock in Its Walls is a comedic, action-packed thriller that captures the fun and entertaining side of magical fantasy. Starring Jack Black, Cate Blanchett, and Owen Vaccaro, Roth brings a visually enchanting and surprisingly

A Simple Favor shows off entrapped women

Film fails to look at struggles of motherhood Despite recent efforts to feature more women-centric stories in Hollywood, few films are honest about the specific pressures of motherhood. A Simple Favor, based on the 2017 novel by Darcy Bell, is a continuation of the recent

Eighth Grade is a subtle giant

Indie comedy is full of hard truths If there was ever an authority on the coming-of-age film, Molly Ringwald would certainly be it. So, it would almost be neglectful to not state that Ringwald tweeted that Eighth Grade “is the best movie about adolescence I’ve

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Stop praising Love, Simon

Warning: this review spoils the poorly made film Surrounded by the backdrop of upper-middle-class suburbia and the white people to match, Love, Simon tells the story of Simon Spier (Nick Robinson) who lives a picture perfect and extremely privileged life. He has caring (and at

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Ready Player One adds depth to genre

Video game movie genre gains a gem Ready Player One claims that “the limits of reality are your own imagination”—and director Steven Spielberg has a more limitless imagination than most. In Wade Watt’s (Tye Sheridan) 2045, life is so grim that most of humanity has chosen

God’s Own Country tells poetic tale

Romance paints a picture of hope for love Through frames carved with beautiful depictions of farm life, careful glances, and emotional walls built by a lonely young man destroyed by a handsome stranger, a picture is painted of a poetic tale about true love found.