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Road Rage: Yes or No?

BREATHE, DRIVE, LET IT GO  // Tessa Blair

Driving anywhere can be stressful. Traffic can slow down a commute to a standstill, people in a hurry cut off cars freely, and road construction makes people late. However, no matter the circumstance, road rage is never the right thing to resort to—and almost always just makes things worse.

Road rage has no purpose besides putting people in a bad mood and provoking dangerous situations—it is also inconsiderate and selfish. Honking on the highway or rolling your eyes at the traffic you’re stuck in does not get you where you’re going faster. It just evokes unnecessary anger and starts your day, and others’ days, off poorly. Listen to a book, some music, enjoy your morning coffee, anything—there is no reason to be mad.

While driving down Speer, or any street in downtown Denver, it can be a struggle to stay calm and collected. Squeezing an SUV into tiny lanes and braking constantly for traffic can be frustrating. But really, getting angry enough to through a fit is not the answer.

Even in cases of severe lateness, blaming the surrounding cars in front is counterproductive. It won’t make the cars move faster. There’s still going to be an apology for being late; it’ll just be followed by a bad mood and attitude. Everyone stuck in that traffic with you also has an important place to go. No one’s time is more valuable than anyone else’s, although people with road rage seem to think differently. Don’t be selfish and ruin people’s day for self-indulgent reasons.

Road rage isn’t just unnecessary; it is dangerous. Someone angry at the slow speed of the person in front of them may tailgate, speed around them, honk, or do something else that can be  hazardous and cause a crash. When people become angry at the wheel, their judgement is hindered. According to safemotorist.com, 66 percent of traffic fatalities are caused by aggressive driving. Getting angry only serves to get drivers in a bad mood, make others lives.

The horn is made to notify someone on the road that they are doing something that is going to harm someone. If a car is about to crash into you, someone is unaware of a pedestrian, or anyone’s life is in danger, by all means honk. If someone is just going a little slower than you’d like, save the energy. They probably have a good reason. Sit back, turn up the radio, and relax. It will all be okay.

SCREAM, SHOUT, LET IT OUT //  Ashley Bauler

One-hundred-thousand humans moved to Denver in 2015. Therefore, 100,000 more people are on the roads.

Many native Coloradans and Denverites have increasingly noticed how brutal traffic has become, and will admit to screaming expletives when they see a foreign state license plate not being able to drive in the snow. This frustration is understandable. It’s not to say that running someone off the road or any act of violence is ever okay, but sometimes screaming at someone inside the four doors of one’s own car is just a healthy way to blow off steam.

Driving can be a frustrating experience. Vocalizing how stupid cars are being is cathartic for pissed off drivers. It’s a healthy outlet for heavy emotions.

An example of when traffic became unbearable was the recent snow storm that shut down traffic. The snow wasn’t sticking to the roads, yet the estimated drive time was two and a half hours from Lone Tree to downtown, which is normally a 45-minute drive at max. It’s understandable that people are driving whilst cursing their car counterparts because there is logical reason as to why traffic should be at a stand still.

Some will argue that the lines of road rage are blurred, but that is simply not true. There is a distinct line between those who yell inside their car and those who decide to attempt to murder someone with their vehicle or get out of their cars to intimidate someone at a stop light. Cars don’t kill people, people driving them do. Therefore, most people are able to functionally drive whilst still being able to vent their feelings of distaste towards other drivers, and maybe give their horn a honk or two.

The advocation for violence or vehicular homicide is never okay, but it is okay to yell inside the car and curse those around, because there are a lot of despicable drivers that now are regularly driving on Denver’s streets.

Sometimes it’s just necessary to think out loud in regards to the virgin Denver driver.

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